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Manager's Minute Archive
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Every week we'll have a new Manager’s Minute - quick one-minute tips to help with managing your practice submitted by the AOA Practice Management Committee. Topics can cover just about anything that might be useful in your day-to-day operations, from HR and accounting to incentive programs and tech tips to speed you through your day. Current Manager’s Minutes can be found on our AOA website home page, and old minutes will be archived here so you can search past tips.

operations, from HR and accounting to incentive programs and tech tips

12/12/2018 5-Hour Rule: If You’re Not Spending 5 Hours Per Week Learning, You’re Being Irresponsible

Source: Medium
Why did the busiest person in the world, former president Barack Obama, read an hour a day while in office?Why has the best investor in history, Warren Buffett, invested 80% of his time in reading and thinking throughout his career? Why has the world’s richest person, Bill Gates, read a book a week during his career? And why has he taken a yearly two-week reading vacation throughout his entire career? Why do the world’s smartest and busiest people find one hour a day for deliberate learning (the 5-hour rule), while others make excuses about how busy they are? What do they see that others don’t? The answer is simple: Learning is the single best investment of our time that we can make. Or as Benjamin Franklin said, “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” Read the full article on Medium's website.

12/05/2018 A Few Words About Physician Burnout

Source: Reed Tinsley, CPA
It’s critical for you to know when to take time for yourself and your family and when to say no. It is also critical to know how to set boundaries that could save your career and your health. A moderate amount of stress and fatigue comes as part of any demanding profession, but you can’t and shouldn’t give in to them. Instead, try some simple strategies to reenergize your personal and professional life. First, define what’s really important in your life aside from being a physician – That’s when you’ll notice that your life is out of balance. Think of the ambitions you had before becoming a physician. Working toward goals that once brought you joy might relieve some of the stress in your life right now. Read the full article on Reed Tinsley, CPA's website.

11/28/2018 The 10 Steps to the Perfect Employee Experience Strategy

Source: SnackNation
According to Kelly Keegan, Senior Director of People here at SnackNation, “Unemployment is the lowest it’s been in the last 18 years. Companies have to change their approach. When it comes to recruiting… We’re not just vetting talent anymore. We have to court talent.”

That’s where employee experience comes in. What is employee experience, exactly? It spans from the moment the prospect learns of your company through the application process and continues through their onboarding, time at your company, to years after they’ve exited.

An exceptional employee experience is hugely beneficial to acquiring and retaining top talent and in today’s competitive candidate market, it’s essential. Read about the perfect employee experience strategy in SnackNation's blog.

11/21/2018 12 Easy Ways to Be More Productive at Work

Source: Business News Daily
There are thousands of productivity apps and tools on the market promising to help you increase your performance, but sometimes all it takes to improve your focus is a few quick changes to your work habits and your environment. Want to get more accomplished at the office? Here are 12 simple, low-tech tips for boosting your productivity at work. Read the full article on Business News Daily's website.

11/7/2018 Excel CLEAN and TRIM functions

Have you ever copied data into an Excel spreadsheet only to find extra spaces or returns added? Cleaning that up is time consuming and annoying - but there is an easier way. You can TRIM cell contents to remove extra spaces, leaving no spaces before or after the text and only one space in between all words. Simply put your cursor in another column where the new cell entry should appear and type =TRIM(cell location). If you have extra or unwanted returns in a copied entry, type =CLEAN(cell location). This removes those extra returns. And if you have both extra returns and extra spaces, you can do this all at once by typing =CLEAN(TRIM(cell location)). Once completed, copy and paste SPECIAL back into the original location you want the data to get rid of the formulas and just paste the cell contents formatted the way you wanted. This is definitely something you should do if you are using pivot tables and find what looks like duplicates in your data. It might just be that one little pesky extra space.

10/31/2018 Business Associate Agreements 101

Definitions: There are three types of “covered entities” in the HIPAA rules: Health plans, healthcare clearinghouses and healthcare providers. If your practice electronically transmits any type of health information in connection with transactions for which HHS has adopted privacy standards, then you are considered a “covered entity.” Any supplier, vendor, consultant, accountant, attorney, transcriptionist, etc., who provides you, the covered entity, with services to help you carry out your healthcare functions are “business associates.” They aren’t billing HHS and thus are not covered entities.

In order for you to ensure that your healthcare information is protected, you implement procedures that are HIPAA compliant. As a covered entity, you are the one responsible for guaranteeing that your business associates are also safeguarding the PHI you give them access to. But you have no control over your business associates and thus you enter into a Business Associate Agreement or BAA with each of them that extends these privacy protections and defines their responsibilities. And if a business associate breaches your agreement, it’s your responsibility to correct that breach or terminate your association. Your BAAs are typically the first thing the government asks for in the event of an audit or a breach.

Bottom line: Make sure you have agreements with everyone who has access to your protected healthcare information that specifically states that YOU are the covered entity and THEY are the business associate. If your agreements are written backwards, you may not have a legal leg to stand on when trying to enforce your agreement in the event of a breach.

10/17/2018 Understanding the Paid Family Leave Tax Credit

Source: AOA Blog
A new tax credit, signed into law as part of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Job Act, takes effect this year and continues through the 2019 tax year (with the possibility of an additional extension). It affects those employers who set up qualifying paid family leave programs, or make amendments to existing ones, prior to December 31, 2018. Should these criteria apply to your practice, you will be able to retroactively claim the credit from the beginning of your 2018 tax year. Read information about the tax credit on the AOA Blog.

10/3/2018 My Favorite Shortcut Keys in Microsoft Word

Source: The Training Lady
In today's post I am going to show you my favourite keyboard shortcuts for Microsoft Word. You may have noticed that I’m a fan of efficiency. If there is an option to do something faster in any of the Microsoft programs then I use it. During any of my training courses, I spend a good slice of time at the beginning showing participants my favorite shortcut key combinations for the specific program we are looking at. I then reference these shortcuts throughout the day in the hope that by the time participants get back to their desk the next day, at least a couple of the shortcuts have stuck in their minds.

For the most part with keyboard shortcuts, I feel that the ability to keep your hands on the keyboard instead of having to move your hand to the mouse, locate the cursor on the screen, move to the location you want on the program window and click a button, is much more efficient in your daily routine. Once you can memorize these combinations you will be working in a much faster and more efficient way. Read the full article - and download a handy tip sheet of shortcuts - on The Training Lady's website.

09/26/2018 Let’s Just Wing It!

Do you have a need to speak with an employee about an incident? Make a correction on an action taken that wasn’t perhaps the best choice? Call a patient to discuss a bill that they don’t want to pay? Or explain complicated insurance to an elderly patient who just doesn’t understand? The best outcome in all of these situations is for the person on the receiving end to “get it” or fully comprehend the points you are trying to make. And that isn’t going to happen if you just step up to the plate and swing that bat. You need to prepare sufficiently so you are relatively assured of the outcome. Have the conversation with yourself in your head before you approach the other person. Try out your arguments on a peer or even in your bathroom mirror. Record your commentary using your phone and then play it back to listen to what you are saying. Each of these ideas and anything else you do to research and prep will allow you to speak more concisely, have organized thoughts and appear more confident when you do have that talk. So never “wing it." You want to appear the ultimate expert when you address your team.

09/19/2018 Do You Talk Too Much?

As great coaches will tell you, it isn’t about giving specific advice to your team to be helpful - it’s about actually coaching your team. This means providing things that give insight and allowing your team to find their own direction and take action. Follow these steps to improve your team coaching:
• Give encouragement and praise freely rather than only criticizing.
• Challenge thinking so the “right” answer is found by the team member rather than just being handed to them.
• Inquire about reasoning behind an action rather than just correcting.
• Confront when necessary directly and right away rather than a week later.
• Affirm correct action.
• Never ever stop questioning.

Make your people actually THINK about what they do and why they do it. You might just find yourself in the middle of the world’s greatest “think tank” of employees who produce beyond your wildest dreams. Wouldn’t that be great!?

08/22/2018 11 Effective Time Management Tips for Busy Office Managers

Source: SnackNation
Stop me if this sounds familiar…You get in the office early with every intention of crushing the day, and maybe getting out on time for once. You dutifully make your to-do list, and get cracking on the first few items.

But around 9:30, the interruptions start coming – your boss needs you to run a quick errand, an unannounced visitor needs attention, your co worker needs help restarting her computer. The next thing you know it’s 4:45 pm, and you miraculously have more things on your to-do list than when you started.

Time is in particularly short supply for office managers, a group who is increasingly asked to do more with less. Read the 11 tips and more on SnackNation's website.

08/08/2018 Cyber Security: What is a Coin Generator? 

As our cyber generation evolves and moves into the workforce, employees are finding unique ways to generate extra passive income on our time. If you have a guest network or do not have website blocks on your workstation PCs, you could be opening yourself to more risks of HIPAA and/or cyber security breaches as well as slowing down your network to a crawl. Coin generators are web-based applications that use “bot technology” to launch several websites that allow the user to get paid by the click or by completing online surveys to view videos, marketing material, or other “customer feedback.” Payment is either made to the employee by PayPal or through gift cards. Users can have several internet windows open at one time running in the background, and the employee can easily get their work done with you being none the wiser. Many of us have some type of separate guest network for our patients that does not have any type of web block, so even though our internal network may be secure, the data is going through the same bandwidth channel. So, if someone brings in a tablet and hides it in their desk and runs multiple coin generator applications, they will eat up bandwidth and slow down performance of your EMR and other internal network systems. Some advice: Restrict your guest network activities to well-known sites that patients frequent such as Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Gmail, Yahoo, iCloud, and so forth.

08/01/2018 The Art of Persuasion

We’ve all experienced it: You have a great idea, but you just can’t convince your audience that they need to get on board. Tune up your verbal skills! There are tons of books available today that can help you learn to sway your target audience using a wide variety of techniques. Try How to Get People to Do Stuff by Susan M Weinschenk, PhD, or Way of the Wolf by Jordan Belfort to work on your art of persuasion.

07/25/2018 The Cost for an Experienced Employee

So you have an opening in your office. You can hire someone brand new at a lower wage and train them up over a period to do the job, or you can pay more and get someone who needs little training before they are performing. What do you do? Each scenario has value. On the one hand, the inexperienced person should have fewer (if any) preconceived notions about how to do things, so he or she should be easier to mold into what you want - although this person may not be able to provide value for a while. (Industry estimates on the cost to train a brand-new, inexperienced employee run over $20k each!) On the other hand, the experienced person may be able to step right in and help almost immediately; however, they might come with biases on how things should be done and not adapt as easily to your office environment. The wisdom of each scenario should be evaluated, but it’s becoming more and more prevalent in business to hire the experienced person who can bring more value to the table right from the start. Red Adair said, “If you think it’s expensive to hire a professional, wait ‘til you hire an amateur.” So, the next time you need to hire, don’t immediately disregard that more experienced person as being too expensive. Who knows? You might just find someone with more hidden talents than you expected - and for less of an investment.

07/18/2018 Ways to Engage Your Staff Without Making More Work for YOU 

Try something called “microshifts.” According to the Advisory Board, microshifts share key characteristics. They:

  • Shift part of your existing routine;
  • Relate to an engagement driver that you can actually control, such as your employees' sense of purpose, skill development, or sense of connection to the team;
  • Take no more than 5 minutes to complete;
  • Impact several members of your team when repeated over time.

For example, at your next team meeting, share an “oops” moment and turn it into a teaching moment – discuss when you made a recent mistake and what you learned from it. 

Download this tip sheet for the Advisory Board’s nine simple microshifts.

07/11/2018 Employee Development is Key to Your Office Success

Two executives were overheard talking about how much they should spend helping develop their employees’ skills. One said, “What happens if we invest in developing our people and then they leave us?” The other replied, “What happens if we don’t – and they stay?” Your employees are your most valuable asset. Treat them right, help them expand their skills and give them a working environment in which they want to stay. It’s the best money you’ll ever spend.

07/03/2018 Whistleblower Cases on the Rise

Compliance with regulations and laws is an important task in our medical office world – and you could be more at risk than you thought. Your own employees can report you for violations of the law, waste or abuse in dealings with the government (Medicare). They also get a piece of the pie if you’re found guilty. According to the RBI, fraud costs taxpayers over $80 billion dollars annually. So be compliant, because you’re told you must do it. But, more importantly, because your own staff can turn you in. It just makes sense. For more information on whistleblowers and the laws related to them, simply Google “healthcare whistleblower.” Make sure to read the stories of those who have blown the whistle, too, so you can see how it was done. It’s far easier than you think.

06/13/2018 Cyber Insurance: Does the Cost Outweigh the Benefit?

The black web is making a lot of money through data breaches in the healthcare industry. It is reported that health records are going for as much as $60 a record. The latest prediction from cyber experts is that “global healthcare cybersecurity spending will exceed $65 billion cumulatively over the next five years, from 2017 to 2021” (Source: Cybersecurity Ventures). We have already seen a number of both private physician practices and hospitals make headline news for data breaches or being held ransom by one of the “dark cyber lords.” While cyber insurance will not prevent an attack, it can help minimize your out-of-pocket financial damages. The financial risk these days doesn’t just include the potential HIPPA fines, but patient notification, credit monitoring services for your patients for years, potential loss or destruction of data, additional cyber security implementation, and possible damage to your practice’s reputation. Although it’s painful to write the insurance check each year, it beats the alternative.

06/06/2018 Cyber Security: Phishing

Submitted by Kelly Ladd, COPM

Is your staff trained to be able to identify a phishing scam? Cyber criminals are getting better and better at finding ways to trick people into letting them into their systems by planting viruses, malicious programs (malware) and domain-controlling software through email. Some programs are triggered by the user clicking the email open or by having the email recipient click on what they think is an innocent link related to your practice. Our practice began a phishing education campaign about six months ago that included a base line test to see who in my office would fall prey to a scam. We have implemented a full training program to perform random tests every six to eight weeks to keep them on their toes. Now if they see a “strange” email, instead of clicking, they ask me if it a test, legit or scam. Our cost has averaged around $3.35 per user a month and gives us additional discounts on our cyber Insurance.

05/30/2018 Cyber Security: Your Firewall Is Not Enough!

With the fast evolution of computer technology driving us to more and more online cloud-based applications, it becomes more imperative to ensure our internal computer networks are as secure as humanly possible. Having the latest and greatest firewall is not enough to guard against the cyber criminals around the world, who create programs with the sole purpose of getting into your system to steal your business information, patient information, or hold your data for ransom. One of the best ways to protect your network is to utilize a network monitoring system/vendor. These systems collect logs from computers, servers, switches, access points, and firewalls, monitoring your entire network 24/7. They record IP addresses trying to ping your network, notify your IT team immediately if there is a potential breach into your network, and – most importantly – stop or quarantine information from leaving your network. The cost is around $1,800 a month, which is a lot cheaper than paying for a HIPAA breach or paying ransom!

How to Say "No" -- Without Losing Your Team

Source: Advisory Board

As a leader, you've likely faced many requests you simply can't deliver on, such as, "I don't want to work on Fridays or weekends" or "I'd like a raise.” I've heard requests like these, too—and I'll admit it's tempting to dismiss them as outlandish and impossible to deliver on. But after some deeper communication with the team member, I often find the request isn't as crazy as it seemed. I've found that I either lacked all of the context I needed to understand the request, or the team member lacked key information about how these types of decisions are made. Read more on Advisory Board's website.

05/09/2018 Through the Eyes of the Patient

Do you see what your patients see when they enter your office?It only takes a few minutes each month to sit down in your patient lobby, exam rooms, bathrooms, hallways, and other common areas to make sure things are clean, neat, orderly, and in good repair. Most of the patient surveys, including Press Gainey, ask the patient to rate the physical condition of the practice. Is your office worthy of an “Excellent” rating?

4/18/2018 How to Write a Job Ad Worth Posting

Looking to hire a new employee? Easier said than done. One of the most important parts of the process is crafting the job posting, as this is the first impression potential employees have of your practice. These steps will help you craft the best message to draw the best candidates:

• Describe the position – summarize the role and list job responsibilities
• Make it easy to read
• Provide job qualifications and skill requirements
• Share your practice’s values and culture

Read the details of each bullet on the AOA Blog to find the best staffers the next time you are hiring.

4/11/2018 How to Recognize Burnout Before You're Burned Out

Source: New York Times
In today’s era of workplace burnout, achieving a simpatico work-life relationship seems practically out of reach. Being tired, ambivalent, stressed, cynical and overextended has become a normal part of a working professionals life. The General Social Survey of 2016, a nationwide survey that since 1972 has tracked the attitudes and behaviors of American society, found that 50 percent of respondents are consistently exhausted because of work, compared with 18 percent two decades ago. Read the full story about how to recognize burnout on New York Times' website.

 4/4/2018 A CEO Who Writes 7,000 Employee Birthday Cards a Year Explains the Value of Gratitude

Source: Business Insider
If you happen to sit next to Sheldon Yellen on your next flight, chances are he'll be writing birthday cards. Lots and lots of them. Yellen is the CEO of BELFOR Holdings, Inc., a billion-dollar disaster relief and property restoration company. And since 1985, long before Yellen was chief executive, he has written a birthday card to every employee of the company every single year.

Today, as CEO, he says he hand writes 7,400 cards annually - one for every employee.
"There is an inside joke with acquisitions that I ask prior to closing: 'How many more
people?'" he told Business Insider - meaning, How many more birthday cards do I have to write? - "since I am constantly calculating that in my mind rather than 'What is the EBITDA [earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization]?'"

Yellen started the practice 32 years ago. He says he started doing it after he was hired by his brother-in-law, since many of the current employees felt he was being given special treatment. If nothing else, the birthday cards would encourage people to stop by his desk to say thank you, he thought.

Read the full story about why Sheldon Yellen takes the time to write more than 7,400 cards a year on Business Insider's website.

3/28/2018 Streamline Your Inbox with These Microsoft Outlook Tips

Email: Can't live with it, can't live without it. While it has greatly increased the ease of business communication over the years, email can be tricky to manage. Implement some tips from Zapier to help create an efficient and manageable inbox. Their October 2017 blog entry - 7 Microsoft Outlook Tips and Tricks for Better Email Management - has great ideas for inbox organization and automation of everyday tasks and messages.

3/21/2018 Your Employee Resigns Unexpectedly. Here's What to Do Next

Source: Advisory Board
We tend to think that conversations about involuntary turnover are the tough ones. But it turns out that conversations about voluntary turnover - particularly, ones where a valued team member resigns unexpectedly - can be just as tough. I vividly remember the first time one of my team members resigned. My mind started racing with questions: How are we going to get all of our work done now? What does this say about me as a manager? How could I not have seen this coming? If you are a manager, chances are you have had at least one team member tell you that they plan to resign. When you hear the news, it's natural to feel emotional, and those emotions might provoke an unproductive reaction. Read the full article to learn what to do when an employee resigns on Advisory Board's website.

3/14/2018 Managers Need to Stay in the Trenches

Ever watch a war movie? You always see the person in charge right in the thick of things because that’s how they know what’s going on. That applies to our offices, too! You won’t know what is going on with your staff, what hardware or software difficulties they’re having or what patient interaction issues they’re experiencing if you sit in your office. Ideally, YOU want to be able to do every job in your office yourself. You might not be as fast or efficient as the person who is the expert, but if you can show your staff that you too know how to “sit in that trench," you’ll not only be a better advocate for them but you’ll earn their respect.

3/7/2018 How to Terminate without Shooting Yourself in the Foot

There are just some circumstances where you have no other choice than to terminate an employee, whether because that perfect employee is now not so perfect or someone you truly thought was going to be great just isn’t. Here are a few important things to keep in mind:

  • It’s not (necessarily) your fault so don’t take it personally. DO think over what happened to see if you can learn from it but, otherwise, “snap off those rearview mirrors” and move on. You have more important ways to spend your energy.
  • Not everyone you meet deserves a “seat on your bus." We all make the best guess we can when hiring – do your due diligence and do NOT hire in haste. Those hiring choices have a higher rate of failure than the ones where you vetted someone carefully.
  • ALWAYS prepare for a termination meeting: Review hours worked so you know the final paycheck date and amount, PTO if it has to be paid out, and severance if you’re providing it, and determine if the employee will be eligible for unemployment so you can make that perfectly clear if asked. NEVER guess about any of this – ask your attorney if you need clarification to avoid a lawsuit or labor dispute down the road, which will cost more to resolve than the 20-minute discussion.
  • NEVER meet with an employee in this situation alone. You need a witness who can corroborate any discussions, threats or agreements made. Then DOCUMENT, DOCUMENT, DOCUMENT.
2/21/2018 Microsoft Office Cheat Sheet

Even with various growing web-based business programs, Microsoft Office remains the most popular set of tools used in companies today. And with how often we use Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint each day, there are bound to be ways to streamline your everyday processes. Utilize shortcuts to make your work quicker and easier. There are hundreds of shortcuts among the different Microsoft Office programs; check out this printable PDF of some common functionalities that can help you in your everyday practice.

AOA is looking for volunteers to submit Manager's Minute content! These quick tips can be researched online or just quick ideas you can type off the top of your head. Apply to write a Manager's Minute on engagemENT.

2/7/2018 Show Your New Hire Employees that Being Organized Is Important, Right From Day One

The first day a new hire is on site is important. Now that he or she is officially part of your crew, you want them to see a well-run office right from the start. Use a new hire checklist to ensure YOU are prepared for THEM. It can include whatever it takes to get the new hire set up to function in your office, such as a list of all software requiring a login with assigned name and passwords, and cypher codes for your entry doors. It can also include a checklist of things the new employee needs to do in the first however many days, such as complete HIPAA training, complete OSHA training, obtain Hep B titer, sign up for CPR, review and sign the acknowledgement form for your employee handbook, etc. You give the employee the list and keep a copy to monitor progress. It shows that you are serious about staying organized right out of the gate and sets the tone for their employment.

1/31/2018 Master Employee List

Do you maintain a current list of all employees and owners so you have info right at your fingertips? It sounds simple, but most businesses don’t do it. Include name, address, mailing address if different, phone numbers, date of hire, date of birth, SSN, assigned department, supervisor, and any additional information you want handy.

Due to all the personal information, the list obviously isn’t for general dissemination, but it can help you quickly and easily find what you need. You can maintain a second list of terminated employees, too. It makes a great tracking tool for employees who’ve left when you do your year-end census and need that date of termination. Once it’s all on one spreadsheet, it’s easy to clean it up to give employees or your owners a one-page list of current employees’ phone numbers as well.

1/26/2018 I-9 Form Revised

Are you using the latest I-9 form? Be sure to check that your current I-9 has a revision date of July 17, 2017, on it. There’s a whole host of information available if you need education, the latest form, instructions on how to complete it and more. Visit the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services webpage for more information. And make sure you aren’t retaining the forms forever. Forms are to be retained for three years after hire date, or one year past termination date, whichever is later.

1/19/2018 Take Care of No. 1!

Make 2018 - and every year from now on - the year that you set a goal to do at least one thing just for yourself. Having a goal gives you a sense of purpose - a reason to get up in the morning. Goal setting makes people happier and more productive. Even if you don’t achieve your goal in one year, you can still work on it until you get it DONE. So commit to doing one thing: Set a goal to obtain your COPM! Learn how to use Excel better. Get more organized. Train someone to be YOUR back up for certain things. Read your email less. Text/email less and talk face-to-face MORE. Or learn to scuba dive. Just pick SOMETHING. Then, as Nike says, JUST DO IT.

1/12/2018 Don’t Let Your “Bird In The Hand” Poop On You!

We all know the old saying that a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. Managers could take that to mean that if you have an opening in your company, filling it with someone already on your payroll is a good approach. That can be true but just as often it’s NOT. Each position in your company requires a specific set of skills, so while some jobs may be filled from within, some can’t be. If you have a coding job open, would you put someone who doesn’t know how to code in that seat? If you have a front line receptionist opening, would you move someone who works great behind the scenes but isn’t good at interacting with people in there? Consider each of your job requirements and skill sets carefully. It would be terrible to take someone good at one job in another and have them fail at another then leave or worse yet, be let go. That could leave you with TWO openings. The right person for each seat on the bus is always better than the first available person…

1/5/2018 Interview Questions That Are Winners – Part 3

The best question you can ask someone who has applied to work at your practice is the one you use towards the end: “Do you have any questions for me?” This one question will allow the candidate to show you how serious they are about wanting to work there and how well they’ve listened to the conversations. You want someone who wants to be there and has taken the time to research what you do, where your offices are, who is on staff, etc. You’ll never cover everything in one sitting, so this would show who has prepared to interview you just as you have prepared to interview them. Remember that hiring is a two-way street – you have to like the candidate and she or he has to like you. If you both work at it in the beginning, you’ll interface better down the road. Remember the old saying: “Begin as you mean to go on.”

12/22/2017 Interview Questions That Are Winners – Part 2

How important is it to be on time to work? This is one you need to ask yourself before you ask an interviewee: “Is it better to be perfect and late or good and on time?” For most, good and on time shows someone that can meet deadlines. And a “good” product can be tweaked to become a “great” product if need be. But being on time is a sign of respect. If you get the answer that “it depends,” make sure to listen to the full answer since the interviewee might have specific reasons or examples for each approach that gives insight into their personality that would help you make your decisions.

12/15/2017 Interview Questions That Are Winners - Part 1

In our practices, most of us work at a fast pace whether it’s interfacing with patients – how many can you see in an hour? – or processing orders or booking surgeries or filing insurance claims. So ask this question of your next interviewee: “What’s your definition of hard work?” The answer you get should provide you with not only a conversation starter but give great insight into what this person is willing to do to get the job done.

12/08/2017 Ask THIS QUESTION the Next Time You’re Interviewing

Trying to see inside the head of a potential employee during an interview is important to minimize the risk that you’re hiring the wrong person. And you can ask questions all day long, but if they’re not the right questions, you won’t get that insight you need. Try this question next time you interview: “Do you hit your snooze button in the morning when your alarm goes off?” Experts say that we all should have a mission each day at which we should strive to excel, whether it’s going to work or cleaning your house or fixing the leaky faucet. Getting up when your alarm goes off sends the message subconsciously that your mission for the day is important, more important than sleeping in. Hitting a snooze button sends the message that sleep is more important than the mission. And there are studies that show that snoozing causes memory lag and difficulty concentrating throughout the rest of the day. Don’t we all want to hire someone who wants to come to our office each day and excel?

11/17/2017 New to a Job? Don't Take the Wrong First Step!

When any of us get a new job or take over a new department, we always want to make a great first impression – maybe finding something to fix right away that makes us look good. The best advice to you is this: DON’T. You’re the outsider when you first appear to those who have already been there. Take the time to observe what’s going on and figure out what is working and what is not before you make any changes. Otherwise you might just “step in it” by trying to force a change that’s already been tried and failed, making it even harder for you to gain acceptance and respect in your new position. So, just watch and learn. Take note of who does what and how. Then gather your troops and talk about recommended improvements, getting their input and more importantly, buy in. This approach WORKS.

11/10/2017 Where Is Suzie Today?

How often does one of your staff come up to you and ask where someone is? Or maybe someone asks if they can have a certain day off and you have to ask them to wait while you go figure out who else is already off that day first. Create a central location for displaying where all staff are each day, including those out for PTO/vacation/sick/etc., and an in and out board for those who come and go. Your timecard software probably has the ability to print out who is approved for time off, if you’re using it that way. You can use a white board or a magnetic board with buttons for each staff member to slide between in and out. Or order a large plastic covered calendar to just write in names of who has been approved to be out of the office for everyone to see. That should cut down on requests for time off when it would leave only you in the office alone!

11/03/2017 Out of the Office? So Who’s in Charge Now?

When you are out of the office, you just KNOW that something is going to come up that you normally would have handled. To keep your staff on track, send out a memo, email or notice prior to being gone that says when you’ll be gone, how to contact you if they need to or that you won’t be reachable at all, and who is filling in while you’re out. That way, no matter what comes up, your staff will know what to do and not get frustrated that you finally decide to take a day off.

10/28/2017 Having a Problem Getting Answers to Your Questions?

We all have them: that staff member, owner or provider who seems to never answer you when you ask for direction. If you have an answer to your question but just need concurrence so you can proceed, set a time limit after which you do whatever your recommended action is so YOU don't get stuck. For example, "We need to choose a new Internet provider because ours just doubled their rates again. I researched several options and have narrowed it down to Vendors A and B - I recommend Vendor B because... Please reply with your comments by this Friday or I'll assume you agree and will proceed. Thank you." This won’t always work, especially for larger issues, but it should cut down on the number of things you have just sitting waiting for a response. And it applies to everyone, not just for the manager!

10/20/2017 Who's the Best to Solve Any Problem?

The person with the most "skin in the game" is usually the best one to figure out how to solve their problem. That means the one who actually has the problem needs to be a part of the solution. The next time your staff brings you a problem, issue or concern, try this approach: Ask them to only come to you when they ALSO bring you at least one possible solution as well. This way you don't become a dumping ground for just fixing everybody else's problems. It makes your staff actually try to solve their own problems and take accountability. But, most importantly, whether you decide to try one of their possible solutions, one of yours or a combination of the two, they have ownership in the solution and are much more likely to work hard at ensuring success.

10/13/2017 A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Everyone loves to have photos of themselves during events they want to remember. Start a company memory board! Encourage members of your staff to take photos of your pot lucks, your company outings, a special dress up day (are you all wearing jerseys of your favorite sports team? Everybody in pink for cancer month?), birthdays, company anniversaries, or anything else that strikes as memorable. Maybe take pictures of each new employee on their first day in a group with their coworkers. Post pictures on your bulletin board and give each person in the picture a copy of their own. It creates a lasting memory of your practice and gives you a ton of ideas if/when a person leaves such as for retirement. Pass around the camera responsibilities so everyone can take part. Every little thing you do can keep your employees engaged in their home away from home (your practice!).

10/6/2017 Communication is Key to Employee Engagement

How good is your employee communication? Do you only communicate via organized staff meetings? Try creating a periodic company newsletter and take the time to figure out a snappy name for it. Include any of these topics: employee birthdays and anniversaries; introductions of new employees and providers; awards your company has won; feature an employee every month and maybe ask them a set of silly questions; upcoming company events; news about your area that has nothing to do with work. Include with your paychecks or post on a bulletin board. Not sure if your employees read it? Periodically slip in a contest with a reward (gift card, a few hours of PTO, etc.) and put a tight deadline on submission of entries. You’ll know quickly if they’re reading it!

09/29/2017 Too Many Excel Files!!

Most people create a new Excel spreadsheet for every new report or analysis they need and eventually have a thousand different files to manage. And they can also end up copying things from one document into another document to get everything all in one place. You don’t have to do that! You can link your Excel worksheets and workbooks together. First, open both workbooks, the one with the “source” data and the “target” one where you want to put that data. Click into the target workbook or worksheet, enter your formula(s) until you get to the place where you need to insert the information from the other worksheet or workbook. Go to that other file (the “source” workbook or worksheet) and click on the cell you want the data to come from. Then go back to the target worksheet where your formula is and press Enter. Your formula will look odd to you if you haven’t done this before because it will include the reference to the other worksheet or workbook right inside the formula. That’s it! Now, if you change the data in the “source” document, it will automatically update your “target” document too! (There are tutorials on YouTube you can watch if you need help.)

 

09/22/2017 Microsoft Word Tables Made EASY!

Are you great with Word except for tables? Excel is so much easier to create columns and tables and run formulas but your reports are all in Word so what do you do? Create your analytical information Excel then copy and paste whatever you want from Excel right into your Word document! Your formulas and some formatting won’t copy over so make sure to get your excel portion ready to go before you copy it. If you make changes in your Excel file, you’ll have to copy and paste the new spreadsheet section again as it won’t update.

09/15/2017 Employees LOVE to Eat!

Do you hold pot lucks in your office? Or is there someone who always is bringing in goodies? Or a favorite patient who loves you all enough to bring you treats when she comes in? Isn’t there always a scrumptious dish that everyone wants the recipe for? Start a company cookbook! Ask for a few volunteers to spearhead a cookbook that you’ll add employee (and patient) recipes to every year. Make it a really fun binder or book that you can add to and leave it sitting out for everyone to see. Once you get enough, you could even publish it to give everyone a copy at Christmas or sell it and donate all proceeds to a favorite charity voted on by the staff.

09/08/2017 Best Employee Perks on the Internet

While not all of our companies can afford to do this, here’s a sample of some unique employee perks found in companies today.See if there isn’t something cool you can add to increase employee satisfaction and retention:

  • Gym memberships or yearly funds toward employee wellness
  • Unlimited vacation days
  • Donation matching program
  • More family leave than required by law
  • Education reimbursement – for job-related training AND non job-related training
  • Kindles for the office to share
  • Cake on your birthday – or the day off!
  • Paid time off to volunteer in the community (also promotes teambuilding)
  • Catered meals on a regular basis
  • Company retreats in great locations
  • Lunch & Learn sessions
  • Transportation or parking allowance or rewards for ridesharing
  • Company logo clothing to wear in the office (and outside too)
  • Free coffee, free snacks, free fruit
  • In house yoga, fitness classes or massages
  • Standup desks
09/01/2017 COLOR ME EFFECTIVE!

The use of color in a PowerPoint presentation or on a patient sign in your office can be very powerful and help you persuade your audience. Studies show that the use of color increases interest and improves learning and retention. So, here’s what to use and when – the key is the tone of the color used:
 
In most lighting conditions, use dark colors for background and lighter colors for text and graphics as the eye is naturally drawn to lighter areas and warm colored objects. The more contrast between the background color and the text, the easier it is to see. The best combination is dark blue background with yellow text.

  • Blue evokes peace, tranquility, trust and confidence.
  • Purple makes people think of royalty, wisdom and mystery. It’s an emotional color.
  • Red tends to trigger excitement and emotion. It can mean love or represent aggression, danger or violence, depending on the tone of the color.
  • Pink denotes a lack of seriousness and being unprofessional.
  • Orange evokes feelings of warmth and expansiveness.
  • Green makes an audience feel comfortable, natural, healthy.  
  • Yellow will get an audience’s attention faster than any other color. It can mean youthful, warm and sunny but can also trigger danger, attention or caution.
  • Grey is used to promote the idea of quality, practicality, reliability and security.
  • White is used to project honesty or sincerity.
  • Black is not appealing to most audiences as it evokes feelings of being heavy, highly technical or formal and death.
  • Brown means Earth, simplicity and outdoors.
  • Certain combinations of colors create their own meaning. Red, white and blue used together mean unity and patriotic. Even some current cultural influences have created their own meaning, such as red and yellow tougher make most people think McDonalds. While red and green make you think of Christmas, they create something that is hard to read.
08/18/2017 How to Put Together a Killer Presentation

The ability to generate a presentation that doesn’t put your audience to sleep or leave them confused so they wonder why you’re even there is a learned skill. And anyone can do it! Just follow these tips to keep your audience awake and involved in your message:

  • Keep it simple. One message per slide – if you have more than one message, you need another slide.
  • Limit the text on the slide. You aren’t going to read it anyway, just use it to prompt your speech.
  • Use elements that support your message. Good graphics can add to learning where bad graphics can distract your audience.
  • Have a beginning, a middle and an end. It’s a story…
  • Remember the saying: Tell them what you’re going to tell them, tell them, then tell them what you told them.
  • Consider your style. A formal font like Palatine or Times New Roman should be paired with a symmetrical layout for serious topics. A casual font like Century Gothic can be paired with an asymmetrical layout for more informal or lighter topics.
  • Try writing your last slide first. That way you know where you’re going and make sure you get there.
  • Last, don’t be limited by the slide styles in your office program. There are literally thousands of free templates online to jazz up and support your message.
08/11/2017: Tips from Top CEOs to Crack Your To-Do List (from Fast Company)

Here is a sampling of how several very different CEOs manage their to-do lists in very different ways – they won’t all work together so try out whatever fits your style.

  1. Make your to-do list as short as possible. Use a single sticky note and list no more than three to eight things. This CEO actually writes her top thing right on her hand so she looks at it all day long until it gets done.
  2. Tackle only what you can memorize and only rarely write things down.
  3. Use a computer app like Evernote, Google Keep or Gmail to list your to-do things. That way if it’s still listed, it still must be done, and it’s not a paper laying around to get stuck to the bottom of your shoe.
  4. Carry a notebook with you always to record to-dos in a list and cross them off as you complete them. Never ever be without that book. Maybe create an “Ideas” page near the back to track things that come to mind that you should consider at a future time.
  5. Delegate! Give your multitude of tasks to a human assistant or even an AI email assistant such as Clara to help with your scheduling. (Clara is a software that lives inside your email so instead of telling Siri what to do, you CC Clara on your email and it gets scheduled.)
  6. Prioritize. Make sure your daily to-do lists include things that take care of YOU.
08/04/2017: The Alternative to the Standard 8 Hours/5 Days Per Week Schedule

There’s a lot to be said for what are now called “Alternative Work Schedules." Whether it’s four 10-hour work days or three 12-hour work days or four 9-hour work days plus one 4-hour workday, there can and should be a balance between the needs of your business and the needs of your employees. Working an alternative schedule can save money for gas and wear and tear on your car. It can give employees time to take care of personal business such as doctor appointments so they aren’t asking off during time when you need them. And it can save in daycare costs, if they have small children. Even if you stick to a standard 8-hour day, allowing flextime so they can stagger when they arrive and leave can still ensure your office is staffed the way you need it to be and give the employees a choice for how they meet those needs. It has been proven to reduce employee stress, which leads to better productivity, better morale and retention, reduced tardiness, and more office coverage due to extended workdays.

The challenges to a non-standard approach are developing policies and procedures to ensure fair practices, reduced chances for ride sharing due to different schedules, making sure all office duties are adequately covered and monitoring employees who participate. Take the time to form a team to see if your employees can help develop an approach to office coverage that provides them with more choices. You can even calculate actual costs for commuting to help show your employees the benefits using this commute cost calculator. You might just be amazed at how successful it can be!

07/28/2017:The Nasty "C" Word

Few words are as confrontational as the words “collect” or “collection.” Both can send a patient conversation into a downward spiral that you can’t easily recover from. Try these tips for both your front office as well as your Billing staff:

  • NEVER say “collect” when trying to obtain payment from a patient – “I need to collect your copay.”  Say “You have a $40 copay; how would you like to pay for that today?” Don’t give them the option to say they won’t pay, just HOW they will pay.
  • If a patient has a balance on their account, whether current or past due, don’t say “I need to collect your balance before you can be seen today.” Say “You have a $XX balance. How would you like to pay for that today to resolve your account?”
  • If the patient is not permitted to schedule an appointment because of the balance, say “You have an outstanding balance on your account which is preventing us from scheduling any appointments for you until it is resolved. How would you like to resolve your account today so we can then schedule you?”
  • IF the account has been identified to actually be sent out to a collection agency, THEN use the “C” word.  Say “Your account has been flagged to be sent out to our collection agency. We’d like to try to resolve the issue beforehand. How would you like to take care of that today?”
    Remember that collecting money is an important and sometimes tricky job. Giving staff the right words to use to minimize confrontation and aggravation will usually get more money coming in the door.
07/21/2017: I Sorted My Files But What Do I Work On First?

After last week’s Manager Minute, your desk should be relatively clear and your files organized. But that pesky Working Folder is still in the middle of your desk waiting for attention. Here are a few tips to organize your tasks:

  • Organize your tasks and documents by their completion date, not by the date they were written. If that date isn’t obviously shown right on the top of the first page, write it on there so you don’t have to sort through a pile and read them all to find the one you need to do first.
  • Put the soonest due date on top and sort down from there so the first thing you see when you open the file is the first one you need to do.
  • Try the “43 folder” method for sorting:
    • Create 12 folders (one for each month of the year) plus 31 additional folders (one for each day of the month).
    • Put this month’s folder on top followed by the 31 day folders (if a month has less than 31 days, move those extras to the bottom of the pile until needed) followed by the rest of the month folders.
    • Sort all items requiring your attention and put them in the correct month folder.
    • At the beginning of each month, remove all the items due that month and put them in the exact day they are due folder.
    • Each day, open your folder for that day and complete those tasks. If you have extra time, work ahead. If a project will take more than a day, put it in a folder a week ahead of when it is due. (Instead of putting just a due date on a long-term project, put a start and due date on the top and slide it into the start date folder.)

The key to 43 folders is to make sure you complete each task when it is due and not get behind. Think about the little smile of satisfaction you’ll have every now and then when you open your folder for the day and it’s empty because you already finished everything!

 
07/14/2017:Where Is the Top of My Desk?!

Does it ever seem like you have more paper now that we’ve gone to electronic medical records? What do we do with all that paper? You MANAGE IT. Here are some tips to reduce your piles:

  • Avoid saving unnecessary documents "just in case." Be selective!
  • Create a consistent naming method for files and folders. Use colors to easily differentiate by topic (payroll – green, employees – blue, providers – yellow, vendors – red, etc.)
  • Store related documents together and order them by date. (Don’t store letters in one folder, reports in another, spreadsheets in another.)
  • Use “working folders” so the projects you are working on currently, reports you need to review, etc. are all in one handy location. (Just make sure you’re making progress and completing those tasks! If you ever find you need a second working folder, you need to rethink what you’re working on.)
  • Avoid overfilling folders; start a second folder instead.
  • Scan wherever possible, ensuring that the file and folder structure on your computer is the same as the one in your drawer to ease finding things. After you scan, shred it! Don’t save an electronic copy AND a paper copy.
07/07/2017: Time Off Can PAY OFF

Ever feel like you just need to get away but you can’t? Or are you thinking that your job just “isn’t doing it” for you anymore? Sometimes we find valuable - and insightful - information in places we never would normally have looked. Check out this video from Sum and Substance done by Erin Wade: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FzPxQXmOLyg. No, she’s not in the medical field…she’s the founder of Homeroom which is Oakland, CA’s “temple of macaroni and cheese.” She is more like all of us than you’d think…

06/30/2017: Where Did All My Windows Gadgets Go?!

Love the newer version of Windows but hate that you lost all your gadgets? You’re not alone! Yes, the windows tiles can display a lot of what used to be there, but not all of it. Wait long enough and somebody will fix just about everything. For your desktop gadgets that display your calculator, clock, news feed, music, weather and more, go to gadgetsrevived.com and download the toolbar to your computer.

06/23/2017: MIPS/MACRA - Are You Ready?

If you’re like most managers, you know about the major changes to the CMS quality reporting, but aren’t sure yet what you are really supposed to do. Start here: qpp.cms.gov. It’s an easy-to-follow resource to explain what’s going on and will give you choices for how you want to participate. The highest incentive comes from the full-year participation. You can choose to submit the minimum, which will avoid the negative adjustment; it just won’t get you any incentive either. If you want to at least get some incentive, you could aim for the 90-day submission, which must be started no later than Oct. 2. If this is your choice, it’s recommended that you start now and monitor your status so you have time to make adjustments before the last start date of Oct. 2. You’ll certainly learn more at the AOA conference in Las Vegas in September! Watch the AOA website for more resources too.

06/16/2017: Don't Overplan

One of the biggest mistakes many new managers make is to assume that if a little planning is good, then a lot of planning is better. You can overplan. Most people who overplan box themselves into a corner that reduces their ability to adapt. Our world is fast-paced and ever-changing. You need to acknowledge and accept that sometimes you’ll be on target and sometimes you won’t. Don’t create unnecessary anxiety. Create a roadmap and know you just might need to detour a few times.

06/09/2017: The Fruit of Lessons Learned

Sometimes you’ll succeed…and sometimes you’ll fail. Don’t look at failure as failure. Lessons learned from failed efforts are often more valuable than a task that just went as expected. Recovering from failure is something that takes an inordinate amount of tact, skill and grace.

Don’t react or make decisions based on the fear of failure or of being wrong, rejected or emotionally uncomfortable. These very situations are the greatest opportunities for growth, learning and improved performance.
 
To fail well:

  • Accept failure as a normal and healthy part of life.
  • Keep trying.
  • Set realistic expectations.
  • Talk about failure (let feelings and facts out by talking with a neutral party).
  • Deal with root causes, not symptoms.
  • Develop alternatives.
  • Imagine the worst outcome.
 
06/02/2017: Motivate Your Employees to TRAIN

Training doesn’t have to be boring. Find training sources that use MP3 formats or videos instead of pages they have to read. Distribute training items and let everyone listen when they have time rather than scheduling a meeting and training everyone at once. Consider generating a quiz that employees can answer and turn in for a prize drawing, which could be just about anything from a great pen to a gift card for lunch or even an hour of PTO.

05/26/2017: Overcome bad rapport with your employees

You won’t hit it off with everyone, and as a manager, you will have some difficult and unpopular decisions to make. To turn those bad vibes around, try these steps:

  • Define - and agree on - a goal of trying to improve working relationships to find agreeable solutions.
  • Have a frank conversation in private about your relationship problems and then focus on the issues causing the problems. Try this: “Susan, I believe we’ve gotten off on the wrong foot on this task. It seems to me that whenever I have a suggestion, you interrupt me and don’t really listen to the full idea. And you assume it won’t work before you even try it. My ultimate goal is to complete this task successfully, AND for you and I to have a respectful working relationship. What do we need to do to get there?”
  • Focus on improving the way you and the other person communicate and treat each other.

 
You need to be the one to initiate and maintain this positive change.

05/12/2017: Can I Ask An Employee About a Medical Condition?

If you notice strange behavior, performance issues, fatigue, irritability, etc. - even subtle changes - you might want to privately ask your employee if something is going on that you should know about. But you may feel constrained, believing you can’t legally inquire. Failing performance is not something you can ignore just because you have a fear that it might be a disability that you’ll have to accommodate.

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), an employer may inquire about whether a medical condition exists that is affecting his or her ability to perform the essential functions of his or her job. You may also inquire about medical problems if you have received reliable information from a third party such as a family member. Try these words: “Is there anything that I should know about that might be affecting your performance? Recently, I’ve noticed X…” Mention performance specifics. If the employee mentions a disability, even if she or he doesn’t use that word, you are required to take proper steps and make accommodations if needed. Document everything.  

Two important comments: You can NOT tell other employees that an employee is being given an accommodation, as this will inform them that the employee has a disability. (The employee can tell; you can NOT.) And, as an employer, you are not required to accommodate every disability. If the condition puts the safety, health or performance of the employee at risk or if the condition’s accommodation “creates undue hardship on the employer,” you have options. Seek legal advice before taking action that affects that employee’s work status.

05/05/2017: REMEMBER THAT NAME!

Someone once said that there is nothing sweeter than a person hearing the sound of their own name. Calling someone by name makes them feel acknowledged and important.

Here are a few tips to help you remember names:

  • Listen when introduced to someone new.
  • Look at the person and make a silent association between their name and something else that will help remember.
  • Exaggerate that silent association.
  • Repeat the association to yourself a few times.
  • Use the person’s name in conversation – “Nice to meet you, Carol” – because saying the name out loud helps you remember.
04/28/2017: HIDDEN REVENUE INSIDE YOUR PRACTICE

Everyone feels like they have to do more with less these days. Here are a few hidden sources you can tap to ensure you are getting the most out of every revenue dollar:

  • Ride your vendors: Your vendors could increase prices or decrease quantity sizes without telling you. Watch what you order and make sure your vendors are competitive with others.
  • Check every order: Review packing slips and invoices with every delivery to ensure you received exactly what you ordered, that there are no extra charges or incorrect quantities, and that nothing is damaged.
  • Conduct and maintain inventory: Everything from office supplies to medical supplies should be inventoried. This helps keep your staff honest and makes sure things aren’t walking out the door. It also ensures that you don’t have a huge stockpile of items that could expire on the shelf.
  • Stagger your staff: Do you really need your entire staff to start all at the same time every day? Stagger your workers so you can increase support as volume increases and either let them leave early and/or avoid overtime once the need decreases.
  • Renegotiate your lease: One of your largest expenses could be your lease, so renegotiate it as often as you can. Make sure your landlord is providing all the services you are paying for so you aren’t absorbing extra cost just to get things provided for you.
04/21/2017: keep your remote workers engaged

Gallup reports that approximately 37% of today’s workforce works remotely. And, if “engaged” by their management, they feel just as if not more valued than a traditional office worker. What should you do for your remote workers?

  • Make sure everyone knows they are a part of the team.
  • Establish a time and method for regular check-ins.
    Focus on what your remote workers are achieving, not when they are working (unless you have mandated required working hours).
  • Get to know your remote employees so you can interact personally with them.
  • Schedule regular face-to-face meetings. You can use Skype but you need in-person meetings periodically as well.
04/14/2017: the skinny on i-9 forms - avoid the fines!

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is tripling its I-9 audits this year. If you are audited and assessed penalties for form errors, fines can range from $216-$2,156 per violation, and there can be multiple violations per form. And hiring illegal immigrants can result in fines up to $21,563 per violation. Follow these best practices:

  • Have a standard process in place, especially if you have multiple people responsible for filling out forms.
  • Educate your employees on the implications of not filling out forms correctly.
  • Ensure originals, not photocopies, of identification documentation are provided for review so that you can ensure they are not fraudulent.
  • Purge all I-9s once they have met the maximum retention period. Forms must be retained either 3 years after the date or hire or one year after the employment ends, whichever is later. Be aware there are record keeping fines if you retain the forms past the destruction date too!
  • Conduct in-house audits every year and fix mistakes as soon as you find them.
04/07/2017: microsoft office in-office training

Almost every office uses Microsoft Word or Excel. Your office probably has a "guru" who creates templates and spreadsheets with little effort - or it might even be you. Giving your office staff additional skills with these two programs can provide greater efficiency and give you the ability to assign additional tasks to your staff, and it can help them in their tasks outside the office too! Consider holding a class in your office after hours or on a Saturday for any staff wanting to increase their understanding of either of these programs. Start with the basics and work your way up, possibly through a series of classes. You'll be surprised at how many of them will take you up on it. And if you can increase their skill set, they will feel more empowered and responsible. Throw in pizza for those unpaid sessions and you'll find most of your staff will take part!

03/31/2017: there's nothing more powerful than peers teaching peers

Employee attendance at seminars or other training venues is common practice at many companies. Take this a step further by asking employees who attend training to give a brief in-service presentation to their peers and managers when they return. This serves several purposes: Employees will retain the information better if they teach it to others, and new information is shared. It will also create a supportive environment so that new systems or information learned in training seminars will be more easily integrated.

03/24/2017: a winning offer of employment

When you make an offer to a new employee at any level, you do yourself a huge disservice if all you talk about is the pay. A position with your company is much more than just what goes into the bank account at the end of the day – it’s also about benefits, perks and job satisfaction. And it’s about career progression, if that is available in your company. When talking with a potential employee, address the "total offer package," not the hourly rate or salary. Include vacation/PTO, health benefits and other insurance specifically mentioning company contributions, your 401K program and how much your company contributes, education support and training, ability to be considered for any internal job openings, and progression through supervisory roles. Also make sure to mention company events such as Casual or Jean Days, charity support/donations, annual company picnic or Christmas party. And what you do for employee birthdays or anniversaries.  Remember, you are trying to convince this terrific individual to accept a position with your company so you pull out everything you can so they choose YOU. Your company is more than just a paycheck; it’s where they’ll spend more of their time than what they do at home with their family…they have to want to be there too.

03/17/2017: documenting employee performance issues or incidents

Properly documenting employee performance issues will save time, energy and money in the long run if you have to let them go, especially if they decide to turn around and sue you. Follow these simple rules:

  • Document performance and conduct conversations on the same day as they take place so they are most accurate.
  • Always include the date, your name/title, employee’s name/title and those of any witnesses.
  • Do not abbreviate, editorialize or characterize in your write up. State facts – what you said, what she or he said. No speculation.
  • End your write up (and your conversation) with the take away: State the action plan you agreed to along with clear expectations you set for your employee.
  • Do not manage your employee through emails - do it face to face.
  • Maintain all employee write ups in the personnel file – not in your drawer or on your computer.
  • Medical documentation is subject to various privacy laws and should be kept separate from disciplinary discussions.
03/10/2017: financial discussions

One of the most difficult discussions you will have with a patient is about finances. Most of the time, it falls to the billing personnel, but the "touchiest" ones will fall to the manager for various reasons. Your best strategy is to have both the financial problem and potential solutions determined before the patient ever enters your office. Have your financial options - such as a payment plan or an outside financing solution (e.g., CareCredit) - prepared for the patient if there is no other recourse. When the patient sees you are prepared to help, he or she should be appreciative, and the solution more easily agreed on.

 
02/24/2017: too much email? automate with outlook rules

Are you being buried every day with email? Do you get emails that you always forward to the same staff member? Do you get lots of emails from a discussion forum or Listserv and like to read them at one sitting? These tasks and many more can be automated using Microsoft Outlook Rules.

By exploring the Outlook Help - or by doing a quick Google search on “Manage Rules” for your version of Outlook - you’ll discover how easy it is to set up automatic rules. You can set up rules based on the sender’s email address, subject line, or other relevant criteria. You can then automatically copy or forward to another person or group, move or copy to an Outlook folder for later review, and even discard the original to your Deleted Folders. The options are terrific! Using Outlook rules will dramatically cut down on the time you spend reviewing and handling email. Try it today!

02/17/2017: 4 keys to creating a positive work environment

EMPOWER - Empower your staff to make decisions and create a plan. The idea is to allow the freedom to empower them to create work how they want to. This is letting them know that you trust them to get the job done. 

OFFER REWARDS - Positive reinforcement is a powerful tool that should not be underestimated. This shows your staff that you care about them; it also encourages them to work harder and boost morale. Acknowledge your hard-working employees. This will create a competitive environment within the practice. When your staff feels like they are doing good work, they want to rise to the occasion even more.

LISTEN - Listen to your staff's ideas. They’re the ones that are completing the tasks every day. By listening and implementing their ideas, you are telling them that their opinions and ideas matter. 

HAVE FUN - Fun happens when people feel well-connected with a team where there’s mutual respect, open communication, and acceptance of who people are, and everyone’s collaborating and working toward the same goal. One office has NFL Jersey Fridays - this allows staff to show off their favorite team. Consider creating a fun team-building activity to spark creativity!

02/10/2017: need another creative way to boost physician and staff morale?

There are endless ways to boost morale! Most physician practices recognize a day during the calendar year as their “anniversary” date, or “founder’s day”. Consider designating this day/date as an annual Employee Appreciation Day, and/or designate the week leading up to, or surrounding, this day as Employee Appreciation Week. As part of the day’s/week’s activities, consider inexpensive appreciation gifts branded with the practice logo or gift cards. Gifts can be in the form of restaurant gift cards, gas cards, tote bags, cooler bags, director’s chairs, Tervis Tumblers, etc. Culminate the day’s/week’s activities by closing early, or extending the lunch period, to allow for a hotdog/hamburger cookout or catered luncheon and outdoor activities. Activities could include a cake walk, outdoor games, tailgate party, etc. If you fundraise for a charitable organization throughout the year, consider a “Pie in the Eye” or “Dunking Booth” fundraiser where employees pay for the opportunity to throw a pie in the face of, or dunk, their favorite (or not so favorite) doctor, manager or supervisor. Whatever you do, make it both fun and memorable. It fosters camaraderie amongst your physicians and staff, and - most of all - encourages laughter and good times.

02/03/2017: FEEL LIKE GROUNDHOG DAY WHERE YOU KEEP DOING THE SAME THING OVER AND OVER?

Want to automate repetitive tasks? Try macros! If you use Microsoft Excel or a similar spreadsheet product for the numbers in your work life, consider using macros. What’s a macro? In computers, a ”macro” (for "large"; the opposite of "micro") is any programming or user interface that, when used, expands into something larger.

In MS-Excel, a macro allows you to literally record repetitive steps for replay multiple times in the future. The details of creating a macro will vary based on the version of Excel that you use, but simply explore the Help function. You can also Google "macros" and your version of Excel to find a wealth of online tutorials, including videos.

So, take a step back and evaluate your Excel workload. I bet you’ll find a few opportunities to automate your keystrokes - and save time in the process.

01/27/2017: How to Share the Results of Your Patient Satisfaction Surveys

When your patients comment on their patient satisfaction surveys, you should share all of those comments - both positive AND negative - at your manager and physician meetings. These comments should subsequently be reviewed with each department so everyone is aware of the patient perspective and the importance of these surveys. From there, gather each department to let them help find the solutions to reduce complaints. Employees who help generate a solution have a vested interest in seeing that solution succeed and feel more important to the organization.

01/20/2017: have a mile-high pile of magazines on your desk?

As managers, our time becomes more precious every day. Our practices demand more and more of our time, and interruptions can be unmanageable. Yet, it is more important than ever to stay up on trade reading so our knowledge is relevant. Try this technique to identify the relevant reading quickly, then spend time in the details when life gives you the inevitable moment where you have to wait.

Many of our trade journals still come in printed format. The first time you see a journal, scan the table of contents, then flip through the pages with purpose. See an article that interests you? Tear it out and put it in a reading folder. Toss the rest of the journal and move on with your day. Then, when you know you’ll have a moment where you might be waiting (e.g. travel, early to a meeting, doctor visit), grab your reading folder and read the information in full.

Paper is low-tech but very portable. Even if you get journals online, try the same technique and print what you’re really interested in digesting. This’ll keep your reading stack lean and mean.

 
01/13/2017: Made a Mistake at Work? Take the Direct Approach to Resolve It

Everybody makes mistakes; it’s inevitable. But it’s what you DO when you make a mistake that counts. In a recent study, it was found that 79% of the people react to those mistakes by blaming others or hiding or just denying that they occurred. The right thing to do, according to New York Times bestselling author Mark Murphy, is to take an “active approach” in response. Personally – that means face-to-face – apologize so the other person can see that you are sincere. It’s hard to show that in an email. The person you wronged will feel better, and, if you do it publicly, others will actually notice that you’ve accepted responsibility and will think better of you as well. Tackling mistakes directly – part of being transparent as a manager - is one of the keys to being happier at work.

 
01/06/2017: Steps to diffuse team conflicts

Managers should take quick action to mediate conflict and limit collateral damage, writes John Rampton, an investor, online marketer and founder of the online payment company Due. Rampton offers seven suggestions on how to approach workplace conflicts:

  1. Find the root of the problem.
  2. Establish open communication.
  3. Encourage employees to put the company first.
  4. Propose a possible compromise.
  5. Encourage people to chat outside of the office.
  6. Don't let team members spend too much time together.
  7. As a last resort, switch up the team.
12/22/16: How accessible is your practice? try calling your main phone line

Most phone systems provide the ability to track abandoned calls, wait times, average entry time in each call queue, and number of voice mails. This information should be tracked on a daily basis and sent out to the management staff for monitoring. Staffing changes, including altering hours of call center operators, can better accommodate high-volume call times. Additional users in other locations can be added to a call queue that may be overloaded.

12/16/16: Dealing with Difficult Patients

We all have been there, whether you encounter a patient who is demanding, angry or downright rude. It is how we handle the difficult patient that will determine a positive outcome. The best way to deal with an angry patient is to remove them from the reception area and take them into your office and listen. Let the patient talk without interruption. Eye contact is extremely important, as it conveys to the patient honesty and your openness to listen to their complaint. Body language is just as important as what we say. Keep your hands and arms placed in front of your body, but not crossed as this can seem confrontational. Watch your language as best as you can so not to escalate their anger. Address the patient calmly; try not to talk negatively to the patient. Use statements such as “I can understand why you feel that way.” Try to remain neutral, and demonstrate control of the situation.

12/9/16: oh no! an employee tells you that "morale Is low"

Have you ever been approached by one of your employees and been told “Morale is low?” As administrators and office managers, we frequently struggle with how to

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